Seelig Law Offices

Proposed reforms to Supplemental Security Income on the way

On Behalf of | Apr 20, 2022 | SSI |

Supplemental Security Income, also known as SSI disability, is a lifesaver program for many disabled individuals in New York. It provides a basic income for those who are disabled and do not have enough Social Security tax credits to receive Social Security Disability Insurance, also known as SSDI. However, it can be difficult to qualify for. Recipients can only have $2,000 in financial assets, or $3000 for married couples, while only being allowed to own one vehicle and one primary residence. And the amount of money that they receive on a monthly basis puts them at or below the federal poverty level. This situation may be about to change with proposed legislation in Congress.

Outdated standards

Those who advocate significant changes to the SSI program point out that the appropriation was put into law in 1972 and that the rules have not changed. The $20 exempt rule when adjusted for inflation should be above $120 for beginners, and the $65 allowed earnings rule is outdated by inflationary applications as well. Supplemental Security Income guidelines also authorize the Social Security Administration agency to deduct $0.50 in benefits on every earned dollar for recipients who can find suitable work.

The Supplemental Security Income Restoration Act

An alteration bill was introduced by Senator Sherrod Brown, (D-OH) that proposes to bring the level of SSI to the federal poverty level. This would set the standard of basic income for disabled individuals at the officially determined amount.

This move could also have an impact on Social Security and Social Security Disability Insurance as well because the amount received by SSA Retirement benefits recipients at age 62 is also lower than the federal poverty line. These retired individuals would also receive increases to their monthly benefits through the SSI program.